Explore Tekera Resource Centre

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Almost 40% of Ugandans do not have access to clean drinking water

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70-80% of Ugandans do not have access to sanitation facilities

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In the vicinity of the Tekera Resource Centre, most people get their water from an underground tree well (The Magic Tree) and then boil it

Water continues to be an issue for us at the Centre and in our community. Climate change is causing the rains to come more erratically and in a larger quantity vs. shorter time period than ever before. The rain is ruining crops and causing is soil erosion or conversely, is delayed months and crops are drying up. We are trying to dig wells for irrigation so that we do not lose the farms in the dry season.

- Sonya Sangster, ICEF Executive Director

Why

Sanitation implies good hygiene and safe water, both of which are fundamental to health and wellbeing. The social and economic development of this area is contingent on adequate water, safe drinking water, and up to date hygienic standards.
Uganda has more than enough underground drinking water supply to meet the needs of its people. 18% of the topography in Uganda is fresh water, made up of rivers, lakes, and basins. The problem lies in accessing it: difficult for the average individual (and community) because of lack of government infrastructure. Water use in rural areas ranges between 12 and 14 litres per person, per day. Most individuals walk 2-6 km for water using a refillable jerry can. The average jerry can is 20 liters, so for a family of 6, this requires 4 trips to sustain daily water needs.

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Story

From the ‘Magic Tree’ (a tree in Tekera Village where its water spring is located) to rainwater harvesting and bio-sand filters, many methods are used to bring safe water to Tekera and its people.
A number of programs were undertaken to ensure TRC and the community have adequate and safe water. There is a borehole well accessible to the community for its irrigation. The Centre runs a rainwater harvesting system on all the buildings utilized for irrigation. Each area of the Centre uses bio-sand water filters for drinking water. These are also available to community members who want to bring their jerry cans for cleansing/filtering water for home use. Currently, wells are being dug to accommodate the new Piggery and additional farmland.

Sanitation is an important focus at TRC. Sanitation programs are implemented in the form of up to date school latrines and girl's hygiene rooms, bathing facilities, and clinic accommodation - all of which greatly benefit the community through access and modelling. It allows girls to attend classes throughout the month, so that they can remain engaged at school despite menstruation. The specific latrine blocks and hand washing facilities for males and females, youth and adults, staff, students, and visitors, decrease health risks, water-borne illness, and contamination.

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Impact

Clean water and sanitation substantially reduces the rates of morbidity, the severity of various common diseases, and improve the general quality of life for those people that access them through the Tekera Resource Centre.
All TPS and TVS students have access to clean drinking water at the Centre. They also have filters water to wash their hands frequently, and their school meals are prepared with clean water. At the farm, water wells help us to consistently irrigate the fields because farmers can no longer rely on predictable rain patterns for agriculture. More and more, we are relying on accessing underground water sources to ensure sustainability. Climate change continues to require us look for new and creative ways to access and use water.

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